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 No.472522

More than 20 detained by Sudanese Military Intelligence in communist party raid
The military intelligence force executed a raid on the office of the Communist Party of Sudan (CPoS) in the capital of the Blue Nile region*, apprehending attendees of a cultural and political gathering before the start of the event. More than 20 attendees were subsequently transferred to a police station before eventually being released on bail. In a statement published yesterday, the Democratic Lawyers Front denounced the force’s actions, asserting that they “interfered with the cultural and political event and detained party members without any legitimate or legal justification”.
https://www.dabangasudan.org/en/all-news/article/more-than-20-detained-by-sudanese-military-intelligence-in-communist-party-raid

COPE calls on SAHRC and PP to intervene in Tshwane strike
The Congress of the People (COPE) has called on the South African Human Rights Commission (SAHRC) and the Office of the Public Protector to intervene in the tension between the City of Tshwane and striking municipal workers. Services have been suspended after municipal workers affiliated to the South African Municipal Workers Union (SAMWU) embarked on an unprotected wage strike three weeks ago. COPE spokesperson Dennis Bloem says the situation has put the health of residents at risk.
https://www.sabcnews.com/sabcnews/cope-calls-on-sahrc-and-pp-to-intervene-in-tshwane-strike/

BRICS expansion hopefuls seek to rebalance world order
Amid widespread dissatisfaction with the prevailing world order, the pledge of BRICS nations - currently Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa - to make the grouping a leading champion of the "Global South" has, despite a dearth of concrete results, found resonance. Over 40 countries have expressed interest in joining BRICS, say officials from South Africa, which is hosting the Aug. 22-24 summit. Of them, nearly two dozen have formally asked to be admitted.
https://www.reuters.com/world/brics-expansion-hopefuls-seek-rebalance-world-order-2023-08-21/

Progressive Luisa González and millionaire Daniel Noboa head to run off elections in Ecuador
At around 9:00 pm, after counting 60% of the votes, president of the National Electoral Council (CNE) Diana Atamaint gave a public address and confirmed the trend that Ecuadorians will return to the polls for a runoff election on October 15 to elect the country’s since no candidate hit the threshold to win outright. With 92.92% of the votes counted, Luisa González of the left-wing Citizens Revolution Movement party (RC) won the first round with 33.31% of the votes, while Daniel Noboa of the right-wing National Democratic Action alliance (ADN), to many people’s surprise, trailed just under 10 points behind her, securing 23.66% of the votes. They will now head to the second round in October
https://peoplesdispatch.org/2023/08/21/progressive-luisa-gonzalez-and-millionaire-daniel-noboa-head-to-run-off-elections-in-ecuador/

Ecuadorians Vote Against Mining in Choco Andino
On Monday, the environmental organization Quito Without Mining celebrated the prohibition of all types of mining activities in the Andean Chocó, a biosphere reserve located in the northeastern capital city of Ecuador. … The National Electoral Council (CNE) announced that 68 percent of the voters expressed support for prohibiting mining at any scale in the Chocó forests. Only 31 percent of the voters were in favor of allowing mining. The ban on mining will be applied to the 124,000 hectares of the Andean Choco Community, comprising the rural localities of Calacali, Gualea, Nanegal, Nanegalito, Nono, and Pacto.
https://www.telesurenglish.net/news/Ecuadorians-Vote-Against-Mining-in-Choco-Andino-20230821-0015.html

Guatemala elects leftwinger Arevalo as new president
Mr Arevalo garnered an impressive 58 per cent of the vote against 37 per cent won by former first lady Sandra Torres, who was making her third bid for the presidency. But attention immediately turned to whether Mr Arevalo would be allowed to assume power as the Attorney General’s Office moved to suspend his party’s legal status. Mr Arevalo said: “We know that there is a political persecution under way that is being carried out through the institutions and prosecutors’ offices and judges that have been corruptly co-opted.
https://morningstaronline.co.uk/article/w/guatemala-elects-left-wing-arevalo-new-president

Irish troops to provide weapons training to Ukraine despite Government’s ‘non-lethal’ assistance pledge
Irish troops are to provide weapons training to the Ukrainian Armed Forces (UAF), a significant departure from the Government’s public position that Ireland is providing only non-lethal support. As well as providing troops to train Ukrainian forces in non-lethal areas such as mine clearance, combat medicine and engineering, Irish personnel are also earmarked to provide instruction in basic weapons skills and military tactics, The Irish Times has learned.
https://www.irishtimes.com/ireland/2023/08/18/irish-troops-to-provide-weapons-training-to-ukraine-despite-governments-non-lethal-assistance-pledge/
https://archive.ph/9U5Ng

Kingsmill workers on Merseyside win inflation-busting pay rise, union announces
Allied Bakeries workers in Bootle have gained wage boosts of 8.7 per cent this year and 8.6 per cent next year, their union said. The deal, which has been reached after the bakers went on strike in late May following a “year of failed pay negotiations,” was hailed as “history in the baking” by the TUC.
https://morningstaronline.co.uk/article/b/kingsmill-workers-on-merseyside-win-inflation-busting-pay-rise-union-announces

UK: Documents suggest Israel tried to influence courts against pro-Palestine activists
The documents, disclosed by the attorney general's office (AGO) via a Freedom of Information (FOI) request, reveal multiple attempts by embassy officials to pressure the director general of the AGO, Douglas Wilson, to interfere with court cases relating to protesters. While the disclosed emails and meeting minutes are heavily redacted and specifics of the officials' demands are unclear, in an email dated 9 May Wilson refers to the "operational independence of the CPS [Crown Prosecution Service], and the AGO's ability to bring about prosecutions".
https://www.middleeasteye.net/news/uk-israel-documents-suggest-influence-courts-against-palestine-activists

Turkish attack kills 2 Syrian soldiers, injures 4 others in Manbij
According to reports from the ground, the attack with tanks and howitzers was directed against the posts of Syrian government forces in the villages of Toxan and Awn Dadat to the north of Manbij at 07:30 this morning. The attack left two soldiers of the Syrian army dead and four others injured.
https://anfenglishmobile.com/rojava-syria/turkish-attack-kills-2-syrian-soldiers-injures-4-others-in-manbij-68905

Books are not a crime! Solidarity with Toko Buku Rakyat in Malaysia
On Friday, August 18th, 2023, a raid happened at Toko Buku Rakyat (People Bookstore) in Wisma Central, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Four enforcement officers from Malaysian Ministry of Home Affairs wearing vests stating “Penguatkuasa KDN”, came unannounced to look for the book “The Communist Manifesto” and then seized a book about Marx and education, and also a book of poetry written by Benz Ali, owner of the bookstore.
https://peoplesdispatch.org/2023/08/20/books-are-not-a-crime-solidarity-with-toko-buku-rakyat-in-malaysia/

Singapore employers using police to threaten domestic workers, report says
Employers in the Southeast Asian city-state hold “unprecedented” power over domestic workers, who face disadvantages in the criminal justice system due to their precarious status as work-permit holders, according to the report by the rights group Humanitarian Organisation for Migration Economics (HOME). Domestic workers accused of a crime are typically prevented from continuing to work and can be barred from future employment in Singapore after receiving a police warning, despite never being convicted of an offence, according to the report.
https://www.aljazeera.com/economy/2023/8/21/singapore-employers-using-police-to-control-domestic-workers-report-says
https://archive.is/LaW8V
>>

 No.472523

Environmentalists sue Puerto Rican government over location of renewable energy projects
Activists and environmental groups including the Sierra Club sued Puerto Rico’s government Monday over the planned location of dozens of renewable energy projects meant to ease the U.S. territory’s power woes. The lawsuit claims the projects would be built on lands that are ecologically sensitive and of high agricultural value, a violation of local laws.
https://apnews.com/article/puerto-rico-lawsuit-renewable-energy-projects-a8ff7b663d708227e84a43afde2cb612

Hawai'i braces for crushing wildfire death toll with 850 missing
The fire that razed most of the historic town of Lahaina on Maui on Aug. 8 is already one of the deadliest wildfires in modern U.S. history, but the full extent of its devastation may not be known for a long while. At least 114 people have been confirmed to have died in the Lahaina fire and 27 individuals have been identified as of Monday, Maui County Mayor Richard Bissen said in a video update Monday.
https://www.axios.com/2023/08/16/maui-wildfire-death-toll-missing

‘We are burned out’: UAW ready to take on automakers in contract negotiations
As UAW members become the latest American workers to consider a massive strike over their union contract, newly elected UAW president Shawn Fain chose to mark the start of the talks by shaking hands with workers instead. “There’s no point in having a big pomp and ceremony where we act like we’re friends, and we’re working together, when we’re not,” said Fain, while meeting with workers at a Ram truck factory in Sterling Heights, Michigan. “The membership comes first. That’s our job.”
https://www.theguardian.com/business/2023/aug/21/uaw-big-three-automakers-union-contract-negotiations

Automaker Stellantis has discussed moving pickup truck production from the U.S. to Mexico, union leader says
United Auto Workers Vice President Rich Boyer, who heads the union’s Stellantis unit, said the automaker has discussed the move during ongoing contract negotiations that are occurring simultaneously but separately between the UAW and General Motors, Stellantis and Ford Motor. Boyer said the company’s plans would include producing a new all-electric Ram pickup truck at the Sterling Heights Assembly Plant, which currently produces most of the Ram light-duty pickups.
https://www.cnbc.com/2023/08/20/stellantis-has-discussed-moving-some-truck-assembly-to-mexico-uaw-says.html

Sanders Warns New Cold War With China 'Could Doom Our Planet'
Sanders (I-Vt.), whose home state suffered catastrophic flooding last month, wrote in an op-ed for The Guardian that "if the United States, China, and other industrialized countries do not come together to dramatically decrease greenhouse gas emissions, the world we leave our children and future generations will become increasingly unhealthy and uninhabitable."
https://www.commondreams.org/news/us-china-cold-war

Teva to pay $225M to settle cholesterol drug price-fixing charges
The generic drug maker Teva Pharmaceuticals agreed Monday to pay $225 million to settle price-fixing charges related to sales of a major cholesterol-lowering drug. The U.S. Department of Justice said the agreement also requires Teva to divest its business making and selling the drug, pravastatin, a generic version of the brand-name medicine Pravachol.
https://apnews.com/article/cholesterol-drug-price-fixing-teva-d56a46b4bae2f715ba613ccad5077275

Billy Bragg releases pro-unionisation response song to viral country hit Rich Men North of Richmond
Bragg titled his response song Rich Men Earning North of a Million. In a video introduction, the British songwriter and labour rights advocate said: “Since I saw that clip of Oliver Anthony singing his song Rich Men North of Richmond, the ghost of Woody Guthrie has been whispering in my ear. ‘Help that guy out,’ Woody keeps telling me. ‘Let him know there’s a way to deal with those problems he’s singing about.’ So today I sat down and wrote this response to Mr Anthony’s song, for people like him and people like you.”
https://www.theguardian.com/music/2023/aug/21/billy-bragg-releases-response-song-to-oliver-anthony-rich-men-north-of-richmond
>>

 No.472524

Unemployment is up and the Reserve Bank will make sure it gets worse
According to the Australian Bureau of Statistics, 24,200 full-time jobs were lost in July and this was only partially offset by a 9600 rise part-time jobs. The official (seasonally adjusted) unemployment rate rose to 3.7%. This is bad news for those workers who lost their jobs but, according to the capitalist economists, this might be good news for home buyers and mortgage holders. This is because rising unemployment might mean that the Reserve Bank of Australia (RBA) might pause its drive to raise interest rates to bring down inflation. But don’t count on interest rates or the costs of living to stop rising just yet because the RBA believes that unemployment has to get to at least 4.5% to stop inflation. That is what RBA’s incoming director Marion Bullock estimates is the so-called “Non-Inflating Rate of Unemployment” (NAIRU). NAIRU is a theoretical concept in capitalist economics: it is based on the idea that inflation can be controlled by raising the unemployment rate to a level at which workers will be forced to accept low enough wages to keep inflation below 3% a year. Philip Lowe, the outgoing RBA governor, warned the House of Representatives Standing Committee on Economics on August 11 that as inflation was still running at 6%, we have to expect more pain in the form of rising unemployment and falling real wages.
https://www.greenleft.org.au/content/unemployment-and-reserve-bank-will-make-sure-it-gets-worse

The fight over gas
Since the escalation of the war in Ukraine and the natural gas exports from Russia that have been curtailed, ‘our’ gas supply has suddenly become very precarious. This means that rosy times are not ahead for Europe as a whole, because the missing energy resources cannot be replaced in time by any other supplier. It can be assumed that gas prices, and with them inflation, will remain high in Europe for at least the next two years, while there may also be supply disruptions. The stakes are therefore high, because the availability and price of gas affects the entire economy, including private households. In the end, as always, the whole mess will be carried out on the backs of the proletariat and nature, and all alternatives promised by official politics are devastating. Public news coverage constantly focuses on the governments’ wrangling over the gas issue. But their promises to bring prices to their knees through government action or central bank policy belies the scale of the problem. If such announcements are nevertheless believed, it also has to do with the fact that the material side of inflation is rarely analysed in depth. Since the supply-chain crisis triggered by the global reactions to the Covid pandemic, terms like “bottlenecks” [original in English] or “supply chain contractions” have been used in numerous discussions about price increases. We want to use the European gas infrastructure as an example to illustrate what is behind these rather abstract terms and to make clear their relevance for inflation.
https://www.angryworkers.org/2023/08/19/the-fight-over-gas/

"My Workplace Is Uniquely Bad" - A kind of disordered thinking that every organiser will encounter.
Recently, I was talking to an Emergency Medical Technician who was bemoaning the conditions at work. They brought up, almost word for word, both of the reasonings above. This worker's assessment was that staff at their workplace were either upstart university graduates eager to move on and start a career and only likely to stay for enough experience to go into the private health services, or older and more seasoned EMTs who fundamentally didn't want to shake the boat. Organising in this workplace was uniquely impossible! My response to this was to try to show the ways that these two groups in fact complimented one another and could well both be good organisers. Medical graduates may have contacts in local activist scenes. They may be interested in creating a career for themselves and have a fire and energy that older staff may need more effort to ignite. Conversely, the more experienced staff have a very good reason to want to improve the workplace and have a continuity and history that makes them extremely suited for training new members. Plus, they remember 'before it got shit.' This form of reframing is quite similar to psychological techniques for dealing with depression and other forms of disordered thinking. That's no coincidence! The workplace, via its structures and bosses, intentionally seeks to instil compliance via a sense of fear and an illusion of powerlessness. It is structured like a dictatorial hierarchy where the boss has an enormous control over your life and exerts that control via your direct manager.
https://libcom.org/article/my-workplace-uniquely-bad-kind-disordered-thinking-every-organiser-will-encounter
>>

 No.472525

based as always 😘
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 No.472543

File: 1692732685205.gif ( 78.47 KB , 244x253 , marx-rent-free.gif )

>>472522
>On Friday, August 18th, 2023, a raid happened at Toko Buku Rakyat (People Bookstore) in Wisma Central, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Four enforcement officers from Malaysian Ministry of Home Affairs wearing vests stating “Penguatkuasa KDN”, came unannounced to look for the book “The Communist Manifesto” and then seized a book about Marx and education
A specter is hunting the Malaysian Ministry of Home Affairs.
>>

 No.472547

>>472522
>UK: Documents suggest Israel tried to influence courts against pro-Palestine activists
The documents, disclosed by the attorney general's office (AGO) via a Freedom of Information (FOI) request, reveal multiple attempts by embassy officials to pressure the director general of the AGO, Douglas Wilson, to interfere with court cases relating to protesters. While the disclosed emails and meeting minutes are heavily redacted and specifics of the officials' demands are unclear, in an email dated 9 May Wilson refers to the "operational independence of the CPS [Crown Prosecution Service], and the AGO's ability to bring about prosecutions".
I don't understand why they're so hell bend on keeping Palestinians under the thumb. Israel's geopolitical purpose is being a imperial porcupine that pokes the middle east just enough to keep all the local powers off balance. They don't need a zionist ethno-nationalist apartheid state for that. They could do that with a normal state that grants the Palestinians normal citizenship. Even within the logic of imperial capitalism, this seems like such unnecessary assholery.
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 No.472548

>>472524
>in capitalist economics: it is based on the idea that inflation can be controlled by raising the unemployment rate
That is absurd nonsense, if they raise unemployment that means that fewer people produce stuff, and the prices for stuff increases.
>>

 No.472549

>>472548
Not necessarily. Production of commodities can be outsourced to third world countries where labor is cheaper and technology also can be used in the production process requiring much less over head. The reason the fed and the government is trying to raise unemployment is because the poors have too much money which is part of the feed back loop of inflation.
Employment rates much be at a fine balance in a capitalist economy otherwise inflation happens, though, the real cause of the inflation was the fed printing 6 trill dollars under covid, but, none the less we will be the ones who suffer for it.
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 No.472558

>>472549
>Not necessarily.
Well look at it this way:

Workers produce more than they can consume with the demand based on their wage. If you remove a worker from the economy by making them un-employed, you remove both the market-demand and the market-supply of the worker. Because workers supply more than what they get out, removing them lowers supply much more than demand. And then prices will go up.

>Production of commodities can be outsourced to third world countries

That doesn't fix the problem it only postpones it, the same dynamic will repeat it self. Third world countries are developing and that means that their demand on labor will increase and that will raise their wages.

But there is more if you put pressure on wages, you cause damage to workers and diminish their labor-power, which reduces the overall labor power that is available and that will drive up the price of labor. If you do wage-dumping for too long, it'll cause a decline in birth-rates and that will drive wages to the moon once the demographic consequences hit the market.

>technology also can be used in the production process

Yes technology can lower the cost of production, but you have to understand that how much machine-capital you can support depends on the size of your population. If you do stuff that causes population decline, you're ability to deploy machines will also diminish.

>Employment rates much be at a fine balance in a capitalist economy otherwise inflation happens

Completely wrong, and refuted by econ-history. The lowest inflation rates happened during the time social democrats ran full employment programs. Inflation began to rise when neo-liberals increased unemployment, expanded the money supply via bank-privatizations and capital decreased investment into new production.

There is lag in the system. If you make workers unemployed, you get a temporary drop in price inflation because their market-demand gets removed immediately while the stuff the worker previously produced is still working it self through the system. After that the dynamic will invert it self, and prices will begin rising again.

There is no free lunch, they cannot print money, blow it on unproductive bullshit like all their wars, extreme luxury and vanity projects for the super-wealthy, elaborate political control mechanisms and so forth without it causing price inflation. The inflation we have now is caused by capital printing too much money and failing to invest it into the productive economy.
>>

 No.472565

>>472549
>Employment rates much be at a fine balance in a capitalist economy otherwise inflation happens, though, the real cause of the inflation was the fed printing 6 trill dollars under covid, but, none the less we will be the ones who suffer for it.

The actual longterm cause of inflation, the biggest one, is land speculation. When people buy land and hold it as an 'investment,' that inevitably causes prices to go up on everything because everyone uses land. Inflation would be much more manageable without this factor which keeps it constantly at a point where there isn't much room for any more.

That's not to say that printing money doesn't also contribute to inflation, but the fed can also take money out of circulation… that just isn't very helpful when the market for basic things like land, housing, and natural resources is constantly subjected to artificial scarcity at the hands of absentee speculators.
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 No.472567

>>472565
No this is retarded. 99% of people do not own land. Land is owned mostly by large corporations and petty bourgeoisie fag. It has nothing to do with the general economy and has nothing to do with inflation. It will cause the housing market specifically to inflate in value which we are seeing now.
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 No.472571

>>472565
Most of the land ownership is now financialized via hedgefunds, and there's no real difference between land speculation and any other kind of speculation. I'm not really sure about theory in this case , as far as i understand it speculators are only supposed to cause specific price inflation for what ever commodity they speculated with. You're the first person to assert that speculation can cause general inflation. I think we'd have too look at the numbers to find out, i don't know of any econ-data source that publishes data about financial speculation tho. But this is definitely something worth considering.

However you are likely wrong about the role of money printing. The gazillions they printed to keep wall-street afloat in the last decade and a half. Well a bunch of that probably went into land speculation as well. Billionaires and big corporations have been busy buying up a lot of land recently not just for real-estate but also agricultural land.

The inflation in the US is among various reasons also caused by ballooning defense offense budgets. Basically the imperial business-model, of investing into means of war to extract loot as return on investment has probably turned a loss. The neocon's imperial project in Ukraine that's certainly a "failed investment".

But in general inflationary pressures are caused because capital invests into non productive stuff. Investments that reduce inflation are building newer factories with better machines that increase productivity, building new transportation infrastructure that's faster and more efficient and better social services that preserve the well being of the population.

At least in principle capitalism should have immunity against leverage from a landed aristocracy. Capitalists don't have to use land, they could build industrial parks in deserts or on massive ocean-rigs. Like-wise cities could be expanded into the ocean or downwards via "earth-scrapers"
>>

 No.472588

>>472567
>99% of people do not own land. Land is owned mostly by large corporations and petty bourgeoisie fag.

Why do you think that is, moron?
They buy it up, it's profitable. They use it to extract rents. A few people own disproportionate amounts of land because everyone needs land and controlling the supply is profitable.

>It has nothing to do with the general economy and has nothing to do with inflation. It will cause the housing market specifically to inflate in value which we are seeing now.


Oh, yeah, because the cost of rent and housing has no impact on the rest of the economy… right… think about this a little bit. Who are these people who don't need housing? Where are these businesses which do not rely on land and natural resources?

Rents are a bigger expense for most storefronts in major cities than wages are, and even if they weren't, they would still represent a massive unnecessary expense paid just to banks and commercial landlords. How is this separate from the rest of the economy? It isn't. Almost all workers and even most capitalists pay an arm-and-a-leg to landlords, and the only reason that capitalists are mostly ok with it is because smart capitalists will also become landlords and exploit this so they can secure longterm wealth with even less risk.

>>472571
>Most of the land ownership is now financialized via hedgefunds, and there's no real difference between land speculation and any other kind of speculation.

There's a finite supply of land, and everyone needs land, and nobody produces it, and no one person singlehandedly produces location value. I'm using 'land' in the classical sense, to be clear - in this sense it covers natural resources in general, as well as real estate. Nobody is making more of that, you can work it, you can move it around a little bit, but you can't create natural resources.

Compare that to, say, computer chips. First, to make computer chips, you must work land - you must locate land with the resources you need, you must mine that land, and then, from whatever is there, you can create the chips through labor. Now tell me you can create the mountain with the necessary metals in it. Computer chips are a commodity which can be produced through labor, land supply is finite. There are people who don't need computer chips in their day-to-day life, but there is no human being on this planet who doesn't need land.

>I'm not really sure about theory in this case , as far as i understand it speculators are only supposed to cause specific price inflation for what ever commodity they speculated with.


It doesn't work this way when they're speculating longterm in things which absolutely everybody uses.

>You're the first person to assert that speculation can cause general inflation.


Speculation in land can, because the supply cannot increase and demand is always increasing.

Also! the value captured by charging rents in a city is generated by workers (who create the location value through labor) and also extracted from petit borgs (who invest in labor and commodities produced-through-labor in order to take the profits), and the price of goods and services is built around these rents even before wages are paid. If this was only the case in some cities, that would be one thing, but it's every city.

>However you are likely wrong about the role of money printing. The gazillions they printed to keep wall-street afloat in the last decade and a half. Well a bunch of that probably went into land speculation as well. Billionaires and big corporations have been busy buying up a lot of land recently not just for real-estate but also agricultural land.


How exactly does this contradict what I've said?
A fundamental problem with a stimulus (and the Trump-Biden stimulus plans at least involved payments to the public at large - the stimulus after the 2008 recession iirc was much more limited wrt direct payments to the general public) is also a problem with wage raises: landlords can (and will!) take a big bite out of it. The stimulus itself really isn't the problem - the government could tax the shit out of land speculation if they wanted to, and they'd solve both the problem of corporate land grabs and the problem of surplus money supply… yet they choose not to, and I think we can agree that their choosing not to is a problem.

>The inflation in the US is among various reasons also caused by ballooning defense offense budgets. Basically the imperial business-model, of investing into means of war to extract loot as return on investment has probably turned a loss. The neocon's imperial project in Ukraine that's certainly a "failed investment".


Bombs can be made and sold, land can be sold but not made. I'm not sure if the war machine is inflationary, but I agree that it is a waste of resources and whatever profits it generates are just lining war profiteers' pockets.

>But in general inflationary pressures are caused because capital invests into non productive stuff. Investments that reduce inflation are building newer factories with better machines that increase productivity, building new transportation infrastructure that's faster and more efficient and better social services that preserve the well being of the population.


I think we're using different definitions of productive, but I agree in theory. My view is that shitty production is still production, because it necessarily uses labor to produce something - investment in land is the opposite of this because it captures value created by labor without investing in labor or production directly. So my idea of what constitutes productive activity is less strict, but outside of semantic differences I agree with everything in this paragraph.

>At least in principle capitalism should have immunity against leverage from a landed aristocracy. Capitalists don't have to use land, they could build industrial parks in deserts or on massive ocean-rigs. Like-wise cities could be expanded into the ocean or downwards via "earth-scrapers"

We differ on the definitions here - I'm using 'land' in the classical sense to refer both to geographical land and to natural resources which have fixed supplies and haven't been created through labor. Everybody uses it, and creating large, fully-staffed industrial operations in the middle of the sea or on artificial landmasses is probably more difficult than just paying rents… and the capitalists who could conceivably have enough capital to do those kinds of massive projects are typically already in the land speculation game as well.
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 No.472589

>>472588
>We differ on the definitions here - I'm using 'land' in the classical sense to refer both to geographical land and to natural resources which have fixed supplies and haven't been created through labor. Everybody uses it, and creating large, fully-staffed industrial operations in the middle of the sea or on artificial landmasses is probably more difficult than just paying rents… and the capitalists who could conceivably have enough capital to do those kinds of massive projects are typically already in the land speculation game as well.
Sorry for repeating myself in this last paragraph, anon #2. I should really go over these for redundancies before I write a big piece-by-piece reply like this.
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 No.472832

You all are retards. We have inflation because the growing capital stock requires more labor to maintain, and every person busy with maintaining and repairing existing capital stock still gets paid a wage that they can buy end commodities with.

So inflation is due to the growing ratio of population employed in maintaining existing capital stock to population employed in expanding capital stock.
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 No.472834

>>472832
>We have inflation because the growing capital stock requires more labor to maintain
If you increase the capital stock relative to population, that decreases profits. But for inflation it probably does nothing. I guess that increasing machine capital stock might mean higher productivity, and that could increase the supply of goods and drive down prices, which would decrease inflationary pressures.

A worker puts more into the economy than they can get out via their wages. So from the point of view of inflation, employing more workers lowers inflation while laying workers off increases inflation. The reason for that is fairly obvious. Workers produce more than they consume and that means increasing the number of people employed in the economy has the effect of creating a net increase of available commodities, raising supply relative to demand and hence lowering market exchange-prices.

If you want to twiddle on the employment knob, then full employment will give you the lowest inflation.

Even if wages of workers rise they can never be the cause of inflation because under capitalism workers never get payed enough wages to buy everything they produce, the workers can never generate enough demand to buy up all the supply, let alone generate more demand than supply. Only capitalists can have enough money to do that.

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