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/tech/ - Technology

"Technology reveals the active relation of man to nature"
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File: 1624273933437.jpg (1.24 MB, 4093x2894, EzuBuRmVcAMYE_9.jpg)

 No.9515[Reply]

I've achieved Emacs enlightenment. My config is a thousand lines of perfection. Lisp machine gang rise up once and for all!
7 posts and 1 image reply omitted. Click reply to view.
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 No.9527

>>9518
>ffmpeg
I used to dump video frames to jpg with mplayer, do some wild editing with shell loops calling ImageMagick and dc, then reencode it with mencoder.
This required a lot of disk space though.
>youtube-dl
Is development still stalled due to a lawsuit?
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 No.9532

File: 1624297841398.jpg (186.03 KB, 1072x1640, 1619451624989.jpg)

>>9525
Interesting thanks

Is there a single based browser?
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 No.9534

>>9532
Firefox
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 No.9535

>>9532
Librewolf
Icecat
ungoogled-chromium
That's it
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 No.9536

>>9527
>Is development still stalled due to a lawsuit?
I don't think so.
https://youtube-dl.org/
>We would like to thank GitHub for standing up for youtube-dl and making it possible to continue development without dropping any features. We appreciate GitHub taking potential legal risks in this regard.
>We would also like to heartily thank our main website hoster Uberspace who is currently being sued in Germany for hosting our essentially business card website and who have already spent thousands of Euros in their legal defense


File: 1624214358404.png (3.8 MB, 1800x2400, nice.png)

 No.9476[Reply]

Give me one reason why I shouldn't.
5 posts omitted. Click reply to view.
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 No.9495

File: 1624236252316.jpg (70.22 KB, 980x653, 1623105716400.jpg)

>>9491
Yeah that's pretty gay, but, arguably it's less boot licky to have a group of devs democratically voted on to pass commits for code changes to the kernel and such. Also it's not like they are forcing us to use proprietary software. But i do agree

>>9490

I don't get the capability argument. The only people that really suffer are NVIDIA fags. My AMD Ryzen will be unfazed.
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 No.9497

>>9495
>democratically voting on people
>democratically
Please do not use words you do not understand. Elections are not democratic.
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 No.9500

>>9497
Wtf is this autism.

What do you think communism is retard. Can you faggots go for five seconds with out dragging out your gay ass tabkie bullshit. American elections under borg democracy are not the same thing as voting on people in and running your party you fucking faggots.

Work places should be run this way our mod team runs things democratically to some degree. This is just ideology. Stop it.
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 No.9511

>>9500
Arguably democracy is a very ambiguous word, but a marxist refutation of the represenativeness of OpenBSD's voting procedures would involve first examining potential factors like vendor pressure.
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 No.9514

>>9500
Democracy is voting to make decisions, elections have always been oligarchic in nature. You're operating on a misinformed definition of democracy that stems from an Orwellian inversion of meaning peddled by aristocrats in the late 18th century. Aristotle outlines clearly in his Politics that the people who actually invented democracy considered sortition to be democratic while elections have a tendency to select for people who are already in the upper levels of society.


File: 1608526111683.jpg (25.11 KB, 348x450, 104891560-businessman-work….jpg)

 No.3292[Reply]

I want to get an old thinkpad, like an x200 and make it into a secure, tor-only machine. What is the best way to do this? Something like Qubes OS or is that just a meme? Looking for solutions for full disc encryption, network card that connects to TOR alone, that kind of stuff.

Thanks.
10 posts omitted. Click reply to view.
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 No.9455

File: 1624122609028.png (372.53 KB, 1080x2340, 1624098196882.png)

Just pay $2000 to have someone else install Qubes on a thinkpad.
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 No.9457

>>9455
what's the market here? tech-illiterate schizos?
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 No.9458

>>9457
>Qubes
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 No.9461

>>9457
Maybe journalists who don't need to know how to partition a drive
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 No.9468

>>9455
They also have some hardware tamperproof evidence thingy.


File: 1623523913942.jpg (34.64 KB, 720x451, FB_IMG_1623417625718.jpg)

 No.9128[Reply]

What keyboard should I use on Android?

Also, general alternative apps thread

>picture unrelated
1 post and 1 image reply omitted. Click reply to view.
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 No.9132

>>9128
>>9129 (me)
>general alternative apps


Browser

Fennec https://f-droid.org/en/packages/org.mozilla.fennec_fdroid/

Bromite https://www.bromite.org/

Tor Browser for Android https://guardianproject.info/apps/org.torproject.torbrowser/


Email
Post too long. Click here to view the full text.
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 No.9141

>>9129
Can this quickly change layouts and does it support Esperanto?
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 No.9142

>>9129
Thank you, very based!
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 No.9144

Is there a recommended phone hardware + OS combo to get that maximizes features/ease of use?
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 No.9453

>>9144
Bump


File: 1624088366796.jpg (39.65 KB, 976x549, 1624083302505.jpg)

 No.9448[Reply]

Holy shit, Google and Apple may have unwittingly just destroyed the highly unethical false-sense-of-security marketing of encrypted-messaging apps to dissidents and whatnot.
For years, many of us here on /g/ who have 200+ IQs and who keep our computer gear in a basement Faraday cage alongside our anti-psychotic medication have been alerting the masses that you can't have a secure encrypted-messaging app on an endpoint device that's Swiss cheese. We've been talking about exotic baseband attacks, OTA SIM attacks, 0days against software running on the AP, etc.
But if the latest reports about auto-installed COVID apps in some states are true and not Qoomer-tier nonsense, Google and Apple are perfectly happy to give governments the keys to the kingdom for installing whatever the fuck they wish on a device. Poof go any assurances that dissidents have with regard to their encrypted-messaging apps.
Keep an eye on this. Shit is about to get lit in the neurodiverse community.
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 No.9450

>Google and Apple are perfectly happy to give governments the keys to the kingdom for installing whatever the fuck they wish on a device.

Is this new? They always acted whatever way a local government wants them to.

That being said, source?
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 No.9460

Those companies always could install apps whenever unless measures are taken to remove the preinstalled shit from stock devices, so it should not be a surprise that it is potentially used for the COVID tracker business. And there are a lot of allegedly secure encrypted message apps that are glow in the dark honeypots, so even besides the PUP installation shit, problems are already existent about security. Just don't use modern phones, if one has to do shady work or so.


File: 1621733847852.png (681.86 KB, 786x606, 1621685130747.png)

 No.8705[Reply]

Getting a wireless keyboard, good or bad idea?
18 posts and 1 image reply omitted. Click reply to view.
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 No.9179

>>9173
>enables normies to communicate everywhere and anywhere muh degenecracy, muh nerd club

kill yourself boomer
we will come and steal the headphone jacks out of your life
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 No.9184

>>8738
Looks like you never used a mouse with a short wire. I still dread the feeling of trying to move the mouse but getting stuck.
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 No.9185

>>9179
>we will come and steal the headphone jacks out of your life
Bourgeois degeneracy. Pay more for less (quality).
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 No.9186

>>9184
USB extension cables are still a way better option.
They sometimes come with a wireless mouse :^)
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 No.9443

File: 1624074244849.png (466.03 KB, 2518x1170, techwear.png)

Never wireless.


File: 1608526097313.png (134.5 KB, 620x258, prog-languages.png)

 No.3130[Reply]

What programming languages do you guys use? I'm mostly Python, Java, C#, C++. Used to like functional programming but IMO now that regular OO languages have alot of function features like first class functions its not as big a deal to write code in a pure functional language like lisp or haskell, better to write regular python or something and occasionally write some functional-styled code
22 posts omitted. Click reply to view.
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 No.9437

These days I only write Python and shell scripts. Haven't found anything better than Python for personal projects.
Used to write a lot of C, C++, C# and Java. I still hate Java.
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 No.9438

>>9437
Python is the best language for personal project IMO, unless you specifically want to experiment with a language of course. Django specifically is incredible for APIs.
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 No.9439

>>9438
What language would I use to automate stock ordering and trend following?
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 No.9440

>>9439
I would just use some Python libraries for making HTTP requests and parsing responses. Requests + Beautiful Soup for example. Both things you mentioned are very trivial until some stupid bug makes you order a ton of stocks over night.
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 No.9441

>>9440
I imagined it be easy, especially since the place I order isn't very busy, I'd need to also make it so the bot wouldn't go past a certain budget


File: 1623984843064.png (48.84 KB, 756x556, 1623949259720.png)

 No.9378[Reply]

While I really don't care about Rust it's weird to see corporations have so much power over Linux.
2 posts omitted. Click reply to view.
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 No.9381

>>9380
Any Nordic European who willingly moves to the USA has some sort of major corporate/intelligence backing.
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 No.9387

Why would Rust attract new developers? C is much easier than Rust.
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 No.9396

>>9387
Rust has a very politically-inclined community full of wokies who are susceptible to trendy politics and zeitgeist, which as we have seen, corps exploit regularly.

Its development and future is also heavily influenced by Mozilla, and the compiler is free of FSF ideology, unlike GCC.

I actually really like Rust, from a technical standpoint, but there is no doubt that it is far more prone to corporate and political influence compared to C.
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 No.9397

>>9387
Also, Rust already has an OS project called RedoxOS, so maybe Rustfags need to leave Linux alone and go contribute there. It is MIT licensed though, so it's basically just ripe for any corporation to swoop in and lock up behind a closed license if it ever develops significantly beyond the hobbyist stage. I don't think it will ever attract a large number of contributors due to the license.
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 No.9398

>>9396
I couldn't give a fuck about le SJWs. Linux is already full of contributions from GPL-hostile companies and that didn't change anything.
You can compile Linux with clang, but you can't compile rust with GCC and the based motherfuckers at FSF already recognized this trick and are working on their own GPL compiler. Let's hope they succeed.


File: 1623876014988.png (570.4 KB, 849x550, 1623616859869.png)

 No.9317[Reply]

How does anyone use the APP? I have tried to use that app over and over again and i just can't get adjusted to it.
This isn't a knock on the devs or the hard work they have done or the people who use it. It has done a lot of good and with out the app we very well wpuld have probably been put on a different time line where the forces pf evil and the bunker won out.

That being said, I just don't get it. Aesthetically the app is very jagged and rough on my eyes. When in comparison to just the normal browser view I still get to pick my themes and the themes look like they do on my desktop machine. There's also just the general browsing experience. The browser allows me to judt browse the board as if i was on my desktop, but, the app just feels counter intuitive to the browsing habits of imageboards i have acquired over the years.

Can some one explain to me?
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 No.9377

File: 1623981751598.jpg (831.34 KB, 1080x2340, screenshot.jpg)

>>9317
Catalog mode feels pretty nice to browse the boards

And I think you can change themes in the settings (although they're not the same as the browser)


File: 1617986347648.jpg (406.96 KB, 1280x720, sicp-shota.jpg)

 No.7742[Reply]

Hello there, /tech/ comrades.

I am passing by to let you know that a Matrix chat for /tech/ talk has been created! The chat has been added to the official leftypol community. This chat is meant to serve as a place to talk tech and programming in general.

Come join us! The link is: https://matrix.to/#/#leftylambda:matrix.org?via=matrix.org

This chat will also be hosting an SICP /read/ing group. That is, we will be studying the book "Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs" and helping each other solve the exercises. For those unaware, SICP used to be the introductory textbook for Computer Science classes at MIT back in the day, and remains a cult classic to this day. It can be used as a general introduction to programming, but will also be rewarding for those more experienced.
32 posts and 10 image replies omitted. Click reply to view.
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 No.9358

File: 1623953919041.pdf (94.15 KB, 67x118, automata-via-macros.pdf)

>>9353
Macros are evaluated at compile time. Lisps are known for their awesome macros. You don't get to write any for SICP, but see pic. related for an example.

However, dynamic dispatch is dynamic, you can't do that at compile time. If you knew what kind of data you will have to handle at compile time, you wouldn't need the dynamic dispatch. Fortunately symbols are identical (every time you evaluate 'sicp, you get back the exact same value), therefore they can be trivially and more importantly very quickly and cheaply compared. With a "sufficiently smart compiler" it should be possible to generate very efficient dynamic dispatch. But it will depend on both the Scheme implementation and the code you write. I'm not sure if any actually does it.
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 No.9365

>>9358
Thanks for the pdf, I'll check it out.

What I was thinking of was the fact (with the impl. in the book) that the cost of dynamic dispatch for towers scaled for every operation as the height of the tower grew, which is much worse than the single indirection OOP languages usually have for virtual member functions.

While reading this book, I also thought about the fact that everything is a linked list. Isn't this horribly inefficient compared to classes with contiguous memory, where you can access any member in constant time? Are the lisp's out there smart enough to cope with this?

Don't get me wrong, so far it looks extremely versatile, but the lack of static typing, contiguous data and so on spook me.
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 No.9366

>>9365
Lisp has vectors (which are contiguous). The book's primary goal is not to make you an efficient lisp programmer, rather it is to teach general programming principles via lisp.
I wouldn't judge lisp based on the pedagogical implementations given in sicp.
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 No.9367

>>9366
Good to hear, it's just something my C++ autism has been nagging me about throughout
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 No.9368

Btw, we're now done with chap. 2!

Until 2021-06-25:

* 3: Modularity, Objects, and State
** 1: Assignment and Local State
*** 1: Local State Variables
*** 2: The Benefits of Introducing Assignment
*** 3: The Costs of Introducing Assignment


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