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"Technology reveals the active relation of man to nature"
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File: 1625357131193.jpg (45.43 KB, 665x629, control rods.jpg)

 No.9781[Reply]

Audacity may collect "Data necessary for law enforcement, litigation and authorities’ requests (if any)" according to new privacy notice:
https://www.audacityteam.org/about/desktop-privacy-notice/
23 posts and 4 image replies omitted. Click reply to view.
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 No.9928

>>9922
I love this.
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 No.9929

>>9927
>Is this autism all for a name?
Not at all. It's typical mass bandwagoning. Probably started from trolling the forked repos on GitHub and getting banned for it to making their own meme fork that will see some basic activity for a few days then will die down when they realize nobody has the appetite to continue an old joke and /g/ moves on to harassing the next denegrate programmer transhumanist that catches their notice.
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 No.9931

File: 1625724773105.jpg (182.13 KB, 669x863, pls go.jpg)

>>9929
You have to go back.
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 No.9936

>>

 No.9940

File: 1625783162636.jpg (45 KB, 340x430, bwahahah.jpg)

>>9931
Why does he have to go back?
>>9929
So it's a little bit of everything? Honestly what does /g/ have to offer that the cookiemonster guy doesn't? Is it just a bunch of unfunny cunts forcing a joke that was only funny within the show's context?


File: 1625270550228-0.png (9.15 KB, 500x187, rokfin.png)

File: 1625270550228-1.jpg (24.29 KB, 400x400, panquake.jpg)

File: 1625270550228-2.png (20.89 KB, 320x320, LBRY.png)

 No.9732[Reply]

How do we fight back against the crypto-tards? They currently have a monopoly on credibility at the moment and I'm fucking tired of it. With the increasing escalation of tech censorship over the last several years we have ourselves a golden opportunity to grow the communities of censorship-resistant decentralized federations, and the crypto scammers keep managing to siphon people off into their unsustainable pyramid schemes. Every time their spokespersons get thrown a softball interview and every time they seem completely incapable of articulating and justifying their system because, gosh, it's just too darn complicated for the average person to understand! And it seems like nobody is paying any fucking attention when this happens routinely because blockchain and electronic tulip bulbs are some magical mysterious technology that you have to do a doctoral dissertation to understand, but just trust us it works. How do we fight back against the anti-intellectualism of crypto woo?
7 posts omitted. Click reply to view.
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 No.9758

There are free alternatives to this crap OP. I think we need to push PeerTube more and stop using anything else.

>>9737
There's no proof that there aren't any good uses for blockchain, but at the moment, there are none.

This is a good criticism of blockchain. https://www.schneier.com/essays/archives/2019/02/theres_no_good_reaso.html
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 No.9772

>>9747
Didn't know about it, looks good I think.
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 No.9837

>>9742
it's a false dichotomy only if comparing random pyramid scheme shitcoins to paypal, but if you want to buy anything on the internet, and don't want to use a bank card (or don't have one), then cryptocurrencies are the way to go. They have a legitimate use here, mostly though for buying stuff you don't want traced. Not even just drugs. Also it's just effective for internet transactions. If you use monero, it's reasonably fast and anonymous. Way better than handing a website your whole bank card credentials and full name and address. I think that's pretty fucked and how you get your shit stolen or leaked when there's a hack of a service you use
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 No.9839

>>9739
Uygha just don't spend any money on the internet whatsoever. Use hard cash.
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 No.9917

You could call IPFS "blockchain based", I think thats a pretty good application. I also use Monero to buy drugs lol


File: 1625541609199.png (11.01 KB, 500x500, 5658210d02e36434a2d244af15….png)

 No.9883[Reply]

Why are there no neural networks for making sure there isn't any hidden obfuscated malicious code in OSS yet?
3 posts omitted. Click reply to view.
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 No.9899

>>9883
because I will eventually poison it to accept my shitty patches.

>>9894
I don't think software 'engineering' can be regulated as linearly in other engineering disciplines. Laws of physics and heuristics humanities gathered are static whereas exploit writers are always adapting to changing environment. They are always interested in what existing tools and defense mechanisms cannot do not in what it prevents. Software engineering actually have lot more in common with 'financial engineering' when it comes to regulatory challenges and we all know how responsible they are.

Security through correctness has always been the way but even after Microsoft's decade worth investment in formal verification tools we do not have killer language or toolchain that is reasonably productive enough to be adopted in mass scale. Rust could fit the bill but I am skeptical of it for obvious reasons.
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 No.9900

>>9899
>I don't think software 'engineering' can be regulated as linearly in other engineering disciplines. Laws of physics and heuristics humanities gathered are static whereas exploit writers are always adapting to changing environment.
Wait a minute, the compiler optimizations that reduce the vulnerability to exploits don't have to be linear regulation, you are taking my building-code metaphor way too literally.

>Software engineering actually have lot more in common with 'financial engineering' when it comes to regulatory challenges and we all know how responsible they are.

No, lawyers write code that is executed by judges, bureaucrats and functionaries, not processors. Brains are not pure logic interpreters. Legal code does not work like software.

>>9899
>Security through correctness has always been the way but even after Microsoft's decade worth investment in formal verification tools we do not have killer language or toolchain that is reasonably productive enough to be adopted in mass scale.
I know about MS's code quality project, but you can't expect a big soul crushing corporation to foster real innovation. There is no way anything new could pass through the membranes of corporate administrations, too many people have made careers out of managing the half broken mess.
>Rust could fit the bill but I am skeptical of it for obvious reasons.
Yes that is the popular example but there's no reason other compilers can't have functionality of this type added. or you could even try to have a pre- compiler as a separate insert into the tool-chain.
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 No.9901

>>9899
>>9899
>we do not have killer language or toolchain that is reasonably productive enough to be adopted in mass scale
what ? powerful language that can be proven formally like LISP exists, they're just an unnecessary headache for most applications, and proving programs simply cost way too much when you can just fix it when you see its broken.
We will never, ever have a "reasonably productive enough" way to produce formally verified code, because its way too hard, long and costly.
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 No.9902

Don't certain sectors (automotive, locomotive, aerospace, medical, etc.) have their own "building code" style regulations? I did an internship at a company that worked on embedded software for railway signal control and they did have a very specific coding style and some functional requirements like everything had to be redundant. But I am not sure if these were state mandated or just the railway company wanted it this way.
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 No.9905

>>9900
>lawyers are not computers and codes are not legislature
I'm specifically talking about defensive programming and how is it similar to law makers failure to come up with sound plan to restrain hedge funds and other market makers not how human minds compare with processor or how legal frameworks can be compared with well defined runtime environment that runs binaries. Beside I said 'financial engineering' as in quants who have to price derivatives why are you even writing this? Wind will not blow in specific airflow with malicious intent to collapse bridge you built but rest assured traders competing with you is looking at everything you do waiting for opportunity to exploit weakness in your model or execution plan.

>MS rant

I'm not talking about their code quality project. I am pointing at their research efforts and its results on functional programming (their ocaml dialect F#), strong types (typescript) and formal verification framework (F* and obviously Z3). They all deserve some amount of criticism but just shrugging them away as corporatism is impotent.

>>9901
Well this is new. When did they invent automated tools to verify common lisp source code? how did they deal with macros?


File: 1623203634171.jpg (42.83 KB, 720x480, 1564180497890.jpg)

 No.9055[Reply]

Youtubers who spike prices of old hardware should jump off a cliff, people out here thinking their shitty thinkpad that their dog pissed on is worth $500
18 posts and 1 image reply omitted. Click reply to view.
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 No.9557

>>9548
Well I just mention it because you raise an interesting point that you can only trust YOURSELF to do shit like this with your machines no one else.
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 No.9564

Are you that same retroomer who is always sperging out on /g/
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 No.9695

>>9513
Isn't it super easy to flash them again after they have been flashed once with libreboot?
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 No.9807

>>9695
this depends on the machine. again, check libreboot.org
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 No.9879

Thinkpads are so popular now I'm actually scared of buying one now. With my shitty luck I'd get one that's been tampered with.


File: 1624038678945.png (17.74 KB, 579x382, 34567899876.png)

 No.9418[Reply]

Hello, tech, I'm looking to develop a leftypol textboard for the gemini protocol. I am curious about where I should get started, or, what language would be optimal for this. I also don't really understand how to get one language to interact with another language. (Gem text and Perl for example) I don't really want to do anything huge or something that will blow up I am just a hobbyist looking to do something fun and interesting. thoughts?
6 posts and 1 image reply omitted. Click reply to view.
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 No.9433

Extend this with gemini support
https://gitlab.com/naughtybits/schemebbs
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 No.9434

>>9433
Based.

Here's another textboard script that tries to remain as close as possible to 2channel but with a database and QoL features.
https://git.bienvenidoainternet.org/bai/weabot/
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 No.9709

>>9429
>That site looks like shi and is just one giant wall of topics and replies. The formatting is horrible.
Gemini markup doesn't give you many options for formatting, just some headings lists and links, and clients can render them all differently.
You're missing the point if your criticism of it is "it looks fugly".
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 No.9711

>>9709
I want something more structured like station.martinrue.org
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 No.9716

>>9418
>he was a windows user all along

oh no no no no no


File: 1624125455921.jpg (29 KB, 800x800, 1615125387200.jpg)

 No.9456[Reply]

USB 3.0 (5Gb/s)
USB 3.1 gen 1 (5Gb/s)
USB 3.1 gen 2 (10Gb/s)
USB 3.2 gen 1 (5Gb/s)
USB 3.2 gen 2 (10Gb/s)
USB 3.2 gen 2x2 (20Gb/s)

Statements dreamed up by the utterly insane.
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 No.9465

>20Gb/s
You can get that with one fiber-optics cable. In principle they just need to bond a led on both ends of a fiber optical strand and put a signal converter chip on both ends of the cable to make it compatible with electrical ports. Eventually it could become cheap enough to stuff chips into cables, especial if the led and signal converter are integrate into one tiny piece of silicon, and you do something clever with the fact that microchip circuits are affected by light.
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 No.9516

>>9465
20 Gbps isn't even a problem with copper. regular RG-58 coax has about 30 GHz of bandwidth. it's just more expensive than twisted pair
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 No.9705

>>9456
Universal Serial Bussy


File: 1625130121380.jpg (37.62 KB, 900x506, social-coercion.jpg)

 No.9689[Reply]

Nice, now I have to carry my fucking phone around with me every time I want to check my fucking work emails because some prick at IT decided to force everyone on to two-factor authentication in order to interact with the mail server. So much for choosing to opt out of mass surveillance and the socially-malignant perpetual connectedness of carrying a phone everywhere. So much for email being convenient.

It disgusted me when Google and other Silicon Valley monopolies started forcing 2FA on people because I see it as little more than an excuse to coerce people into giving up contact information to better track and surveil them. What's the real deal with two-factor authentication? Why is it seemingly impossible to find an article critical towards it on a simple web search?
1 post and 1 image reply omitted. Click reply to view.
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 No.9694

>>9692
>use the secure token
For some reason we have to try out all the insecure authentications, and only when all of that has failed is it allowed to do the secure thing and use a token
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 No.9696

>I see it as little more than an excuse to coerce people into giving up contact information to better track and surveil them
You aren't wrong, your IT department is retarded.
https://blog.cmpxchg8b.com/2020/07/you-dont-need-sms-2fa.html
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 No.9697

>Why is it seemingly impossible to find an article critical towards it on a simple web search?

We need to break this search engine monopoly over what information is available. It's amazing how you can't find anything critical about entrenched IT shit like "cloud", or 2FA or any reliable information about user data being sold except in obscure mailing lists and niche tech communities.
I hope searx takes off.

Also, "IT departments" are cargo cults a majority of the time. Just blindly following whatever is "recommended" to them through their infra provider like IBM or Oracle, or the cloud providers like AWS or Azure these days.
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 No.9702

>>9689
>an excuse to coerce people into giving up contact information to better track and surveil them
Use TOTP instead of SMS.
>Why is it seemingly impossible to find an article critical towards it on a simple web search?
Because 2FA is a good thing. Most people use insecure or reused passwords. Any competent IT department requires it because it massively reduces the risk of account compromise.
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 No.9703

I use this for github, no contact information needed, works offline, free software: https://f-droid.org/en/packages/org.shadowice.flocke.andotp/


File: 1624889713748.jpg (139.05 KB, 1000x380, jobs.jpg)

 No.9623[Reply]

I've accumulated some decent skills in coding/debugging and I was wondering if any of you knew of any job boards that posted odd jobs for programmers to make a quick $ or whatever.
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 No.9624

There were some code bounty programs for FOSS maybe they are still a thing?
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 No.9625

>>9624
I'll look that up. Thanks.
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 No.9626

There's a full service dedicated to this but I heard that the companies totally dominate the code monkeys contractually and they regularly don't pay out


File: 1623427821448-0.png (53.61 KB, 901x359, Screenshot 2021-06-01 1817….png)

File: 1623427821448-1.png (15.46 KB, 932x364, Screenshot 2021-05-30 1440….png)

 No.9110[Reply]

brief observations on fires
>1:Once a substance is ignited it cant be set on fire again

>2:fires spread based off their temperature, the hotter a region is the faster the fire spreads


>3:Objects will increase in mass after being set on fire


>4:an unbreathable smell will be created after an object is set on fire


>5: fires are observed to die when covered with something with alot of mass even if it is flammable


hypothesis
>1a: the reason why you cant set a burnt object on fire again is because the substance has already reacted with its environment in a matter that it cant produce an exothermic reaction again

>evidence: when I put an ignited match in water 5 times the fire on the match went out 100% of the time and couldnt be ignited again

Post too long. Click here to view the full text.
13 posts and 7 image replies omitted. Click reply to view.
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 No.9558

File: 1624404547971.jpg (43.35 KB, 680x633, >.jpg)

torch bright light light

make go hot in brr brr yuga

food go torch go hot hot

torch normal no magic, torch just torch
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 No.9560

>>9550
yeah but some of the burned reactant is turned into gasses
isn't it literally like carbon + oxygen -> co2 + h20?
these things leave the original object.
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 No.9577

>>9149
Prove your hypothesis
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 No.9614

File: 1624849803748.jpg (89.83 KB, 539x900, prometheus-carrying-fire-j….jpg)

>>9543
Yes.
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 No.9615

>>9149
>Yeah you'll also turn to ashes dumbass

Introducing the Waste Not Wood Ash workshop series where the Living Web Farms biochar crew takes a deep dive into understanding applications for one of our most common everyday waste products. As we deal with ashes from the last wood stove season and prepare for the next, discover practical everyday uses for wood ashes you can use year round. We’ll also explore the science of how and why wood ashes work in the garden, as an ingredient for natural soap making, or even as an ingredient in natural building materials. In part 1, Dan begins by filling in some of the gaps in wood ash research and sifting through some of the more and less useful info found on the internet.
If you have more clever ideas about how you use wood ashes around the farm and homestead, please share them in the comments below.


File: 1623943903030.jpg (124.24 KB, 1600x1200, iuoui.jpg)

 No.9352[Reply]

Does the failure of Linux desktop prove that communism will never work?

feels like a barely functioning toy compare to the commercial options. they argue over irrelevant differences, constantly reinvent the wheel, never innovate, barely handles the basics.

it has no profit motive to unite or to sort boring problems.
53 posts and 6 image replies omitted. Click reply to view.
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 No.9531

>>9529
also slave morality would be doing the opposite of apple because they're the leaders.
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 No.9533

>>9530
>Choices on behalf of the user
Yes some choices are very, dare I say, stupid. There's a popular meme about linux UI/freetard graphic design and etc. I would say arrogance too, detachment from what users actually desire, mixed with a degree of narcissism "I'm gonna make my own le-arch-forkerinOS" instead of contributing to something already great
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 No.9554

>>9529
They are absolutely pathetic.
Never forget that Apple was in danger of going out of business in the 90s and they were kept afloat only due to the sheer cuckedness of their fans who kept throwing money at their overpriced and outdated (especially classic MacOS) products just because of the rainbow apple logo. And apple doesn't even treat these users well, sometimes even going to the extent of suing some blogger appletard users for sharing product rumours.
I don't think it's possible for there to be a more examplary epitome of corporate bootlicking than macfags. They don't just do it for free, they literally pay premium prices from their own pockets for it.
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 No.9555

>>9384
You can with third party programs, I use AlwaysOnTop.
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 No.9556

I tried switching to Debian a few years ago and really liked it but no matter what I tried my G13 refused to work with it, and I rely on that too much. If only there was a G13 with on-board memory for the keys.


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