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"Technology reveals the active relation of man to nature"
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File: 1670071029951.png (12.63 KB, 539x680, jpegxl-logo.png)

 No.11235[Reply]

So apparently Palemoon became the first browser to officially implemented JPEG XL a week ago. At the same time, Google just dropped it from Chromium despite supporting it behind a flag for months. What the hell is going on here? Is Google that desperate to push their video-codecs-as-image-formats that they're willing to sabotage a massive step forward for the web? JPEG XL is capable of replacing both original JPEG, PNG, and animated GIF/PNG all at once with a single file type that produces superior file sizes for all three categories of use cases. Neither WebP, HEIC, nor AVIF were ever able to make such a broad, sweeping improvement because they are geared more towards features important to video encoding than still images or lossless animation.

It seems like every few weeks these days I find something new to get mad about in the world of web development.
1 post omitted. Click reply to view.
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 No.11237

Holy shit I didn't know this was a thing hell yeah. Fuck google. I use FF anyways.
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 No.11245

>muh firefoox
spyware
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 No.11246

>>11245
Everyone knows firefox is spyware but it's the best choice out of all the choices you have because it allows you to de-spyware it.
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 No.11247

>>11246
you can de-spyware chrome too
the only thing good about the foox is that tor uses it

there are just no good browsers period

it's all either straight up spyware or outdated shit that gets updated once a decade
the best variant I found is falkon that uses qtwebengine (ie chromium blink engine)
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 No.11250

>>11247
Palemoon gets updated pretty regularly actually. The problem isn't that it's outdated, the problem is that Google aggressively pushes constantly changing web "standards" that developers without tens of millions of dollars worth of resources can't keep up with.


File: 1608526369145.jpg (278.48 KB, 1920x1280, 1605832235464.jpg)

 No.5698[Reply]

>still thinking it was suicide
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 No.5699

HELLOOOOOOOOOOO REDDIT
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 No.5751

>>5698
he knew too much… lol
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 No.11238

How I sucide please answer me
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 No.11239

I wish to please tell me how?


File: 1622348654209.jpg (259.63 KB, 750x747, 1622345685245.jpg)

 No.8858[Reply]

>'Apple is eating our lunch': Google employees admit in lawsuit that the company made it nearly impossible for users to keep their location private
>Google made it nearly impossible for users to keep their location private, according to newly unredacted court documents.
>Google continued collecting location data even when users turned off various location-sharing settings, made popular privacy settings harder to find, and even pressured LG and other phone makers into hiding settings precisely because users liked them, according to the documents.
>When Google tested versions of its Android operating system that made privacy settings easier to find, users took advantage of them, which Google viewed as a "problem," according to the documents.
>Google also tried to convince smartphone makers to hide location settings "through active misrepresentations and/or concealment, suppression, or omission of facts"
>Google employees appeared to recognize that users were frustrated by the company's aggressive data collection practices, potentially hurting its business.
>"Fail #2: *I* should be able to get *my* location on *my* phone without sharing that information with Google," one employee said.
>"This may be how Apple is eating our lunch," they added, saying Apple was "much more likely" to let users take advantage of location-based apps and services on their phones without sharing the data with Apple.
https://archive.is/QYw62
1 post and 1 image reply omitted. Click reply to view.
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 No.11207

>proprietary software tracks users
stop the presses! call the president!
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 No.11208

>>11207
>'Left' today is delivering sarcastic one liners while thinking oneself is a deep, original thinker and more highly informed than others. Maybe it always was.
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 No.11210

>>11208
I'm informed enough that I don't need google employees to know that you can't "keep your location private" while using your phone

especially lmaoed at this
>Google employees appeared to recognize that users were frustrated by the company's aggressive data collection practices, potentially hurting its business.
dear "google employees", Google business IS data collection
fucking bitches take people for retards I swear
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 No.11211

>>11207
There is a difference between what we know to be true, and what we can show to be true in the fairy tale world of the legal system. This is why this qualifies as news, because the issue has now moved into the latter group, so they can no longer lie about it in subsequent related trials.

Similarly, we knew the state suppresses inconvenient stories from social media, but now we can also show it to be true using the government's own documents. >>11193
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 No.11234

File: 1669897136689.jpg (111.07 KB, 1600x900, af28d3454857f3dfdd628a12ed….jpg)

Apple being cut from exactly the same cloth as Google:

https://gizmodo.com/apple-iphone-analytics-tracking-even-when-off-app-store-1849757558
> Apple Is Tracking You Even When Its Own Privacy Settings Say It’s Not, New Research Says
> An independent test suggests Apple collects data about you and your phone when its own settings promise to “disable the sharing of Device Analytics altogether.”
> November 8, 2022

> For all of Apple’s talk about how private your iPhone is, the company vacuums up a lot of data about you. iPhones do have a privacy setting that is supposed to turn off that tracking. According to a new report by independent researchers, though, Apple collects extremely detailed information on you with its own apps even when you turn off tracking, an apparent direct contradiction of Apple’s own description of how the privacy protection works.


> The iPhone Analytics setting makes an explicit promise. Turn it off, and Apple says that it will “disable the sharing of Device Analytics altogether.” However, Tommy Mysk and Talal Haj Bakry, two app developers and security researchers at the software company Mysk, took a look at the data collected by a number of Apple iPhone apps—the App Store, Apple Music, Apple TV, Books, and Stocks. They found the analytics control and other privacy settings had no obvious effect on Apple’s data collection—the tracking remained the same whether iPhone Analytics was switched on or off.


File: 1668026570712.jpg (47.36 KB, 440x440, GettyImages-1146666414-dhs….jpg)

 No.11193[Reply]

https://theintercept.com/2022/10/31/social-media-disinformation-dhs/
Leaked Documents Outline DHS’s Plans to Police Disinformation
October 31 2022, 9:00 a.m.

Behind closed doors, and through pressure on private platforms, the U.S. government has used its power to try to shape online discourse. According to meeting minutes and other records appended to a lawsuit filed by Missouri Attorney General Eric Schmitt, a Republican who is also running for Senate, discussions have ranged from the scale and scope of government intervention in online discourse to the mechanics of streamlining takedown requests for false or intentionally misleading information.
[…]
There is also a formalized process for government officials to directly flag content on Facebook or Instagram and request that it be throttled or suppressed through a special Facebook portal that requires a government or law enforcement email to use. At the time of writing, the “content request system” at facebook.com/xtakedowns/login is still live. DHS and Meta, the parent company of Facebook, did not respond to a request for comment. The FBI declined to comment.
[…]
To accomplish these broad goals, the report said, CISA should invest in external research to evaluate the “efficacy of interventions,” specifically with research looking at how alleged disinformation can be countered and how quickly messages spread. Geoff Hale, the director of the Election Security Initiative at CISA, recommended the use of third-party information-sharing nonprofits as a “clearing house for information to avoid the appearance of government propaganda.”
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 No.11194

Interesting leak

It's within the right of private platforms to suppress whatever they don't like, but when a secret portal is created for the US govt to direct such suppression, this might cross into a violation of the 1st amendment. A lawsuit may come out of this.

Also really puts the suppression of various news stories (Hunter laptop, coof related stuff) into greater perspective
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 No.11195

File: 1668080916993.jpg (84.78 KB, 700x525, Prism_slide_5.jpg)

>>11194
>A lawsuit may come out of this.
Were they sued over PRISM? https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PRISM I'm pretty sure the FISA can be used to shut down any pesky lawsuit.

>the suppression of various news stories

The government is also not shy about manufacturing:
https://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2017/07/state-department-concocting-fake-intellectual-property-twitter-feud/
State Department concocting “fake” intellectual property “Twitter feud”
“Our public diplomacy office is still settling on a hashtag,” State Department says.
Jul 6, 2017 7:41 pm UTC

The US State Department wants to team up with other government agencies and Hollywood in a bid to create a "fake Twitter feud" about the importance of intellectual property rights. As part of this charade, the State Department's Bureau of Economic Affairs says it has been seeking the participation of the US Office of Intellectual Property Enforcement, the Motion Picture Association of America, the Recording Industry Association of America, the US Patent and Trademark Office, and "others."

To make the propaganda plot seem more legitimate, the State Department is trying to enlist Stanford Law School and "similar academic institutions" to play along on the @StateDept feed on Twitter.


File: 1608526378578.png (1.24 MB, 3548x1704, 1606321203120.png)

 No.5792[Reply]

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/11/24/science/artificial-intelligence-ai-gpt3.html
As if the noise-to-signal ratio of internet content wasn't bad enough.
8 posts and 1 image reply omitted. Click reply to view.
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 No.5913

>>5794
An AI trained with this website as a dataset would be an abomination.
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 No.5917

>>5913
Someone should do it
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 No.5929

>>5794
It's not available to the public because they don't want anyone but glowies to have it iirc
>>5913
/leftybot/ when?
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 No.11191

what do you think google has been doing for the past 30 years, just that reading everything and learning
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 No.11192

>>5913
420chan used to have netjester. We should totally do something like that.


File: 1665638467097.jpg (37.87 KB, 720x627, comedyheaven-y2juaq.jpg)

 No.11165[Reply]

What is keeping this charade going? Why would anyone think it's the next big thing. VR headsets still make most people motion sick.
6 posts and 1 image reply omitted. Click reply to view.
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 No.11172

>>11171
I mean cloudflair isn't the only upstream provider that exists. Just the largest. You are right about web 2.0 (but you didn't have to be a dick that hurt my feelings) but I think you haven't spent a lot of time lurking around the underbelly of the web where a whole community of small self hosted sites exists. There's also gemini and gopher which are making a resurgence. I mean just cause most normies use the path of least resistance doesn't mean the internet isn't exactly what marx was speaking of anyways. It's still that. That's how I am able to have cable tv and any movie, show, anime, etc etc I want free for ever.

I don't disagree with you really but I think you have a far to pessimistic angle on it.
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 No.11173

>>11165
VR will have many niche applications like relaxing environment simulator for hospital patients, Submarine crews, long-haul travel, and maybe even as pacification for refugee camp situations.

VR-entertainment could have already been a small commercial success, if it was offered as an arcade-service.
Imagine arcade-machines that are composed of a powerful computer, vr-goggles and various mechanical force feed-back-simulation-harnesses. People could rent time on a VRcade-machine. Valve's VR with an enthusiast set-up comes closest to this currently.
I had hoped for VR tourism.

For the general public a VR set up has to be self-contained in the goggles, with several hours of battery run time.
The only way to make this happen with appealing optical quality in a compact and energy efficient enough way is to make dedicated asic chips for each entertainment experience. Which basically means going back to physical cartridges.
If one were to build an opensource ASIC-chip ecosystem with a complementary development stack it might be economically viable.
Since more of the logic is expressed in hardware, it is much faster and energy efficient, however the ability to patch bugs after release is also much more limited, and the biggest hurdle for this is probably going to be achieving the necessary quality control.

Facebook is a dying empire, and Metaverse is Zuck's attempt to keep it going. It's mostly just a second life remake, but it's probably worse because all the digital-real estate pay to play shit will kill any escapism potential this might have had. For some reason the metaverse graphics look worse than what second life had over a decade ago. Also are you willing to trust Facebook with all your senses ?

I don't think that VR or 3d entertainment will really die, eventually somebody will find a way to make it work.
Maybe when optical interconnects for data-lines on circuit-boards go into general production, it might become possible to make a consumer grade general purpose computer have low enough latency to drive vr-goggles.
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 No.11174

File: 1665687781050.png (3.23 MB, 5760x3600, benis2.png)

The reason is is that apparently there was a working business model for the metaverse already working in underground VR Chat rooms.
This guy talks about the underground furry sex scene that existed for a while in VR Chat. It was kicked off by a VR Chat application that allowed people to exchange Wownero (a fork of the crypto currency Monero) with each other via an in game wallet that worked by simply handing cash to each other as you would in real life.
This set off an explosion in virtual prostitutes, night clubs, headlining dj's and other alternative lifestyle/night life services. This guy says that people were making real money, as much as several hundred dollars a night either sucking virtual dicks as a furry or spinning records on a turntable for a party.
This made Wownero explode in value for a short period of time, which you can see for yourself, until the VR Chat Wownero Wallet developers pulled the plug the plug on their application. Which killed the scene and crashed the price of Wownero.
I can validate exactly none of this but it seems really plausible and would explain why so many companies are going to hard into the paint on VR metaverses.
https://odysee.com/@TheCastle:8/2022-03-03-17-16-28:7
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 No.11184

>>11174
any more stylish anime dick pics?
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 No.11187

As mentioned before in other threads, it's likepy that metaverse is really just a money laundering scheme.


File: 1608526287100.png (32.83 KB, 432x432, 1565502518003.png)

 No.4951[Reply][Last 50 Posts]

This Thread Has Been Re-appropriated for leftychan.net Usage.

General thread meant for the discussion of the mobile app for browsing leftypol.org, known as clover.

Releases can be found here:
https://github.com/PietroCarrara/Clover/releases/latest
240 posts and 36 image replies omitted. Click reply to view.
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 No.10724

>>10717
Based.
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 No.10760

>>10717
nice blog pietro

pls review Click the cinematic masterpiece
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 No.10762

>>10760
Next post will probably be how to optimize the output of a factory using Kantorovich's method *if I can get a grip on this shit*
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 No.10770

>>10762
i understood zero of what you said
i don't own a factory man
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 No.11175

I've been looking into what's needed for both leftychan and leftypol sites to be converted into the latest kurobas. It looks like it just needs to be imported more than anything with the correct type of chan engine.

I'm not a coder but I'm not too dumb in understanding what might be required for conversion. I've found the original source code and two potential forks we can use.

I'll make an update on this next weekend.

If you know how to do java, please let me know. We might can get this fixed way easier and probably even leave directions when shit hits the fan again.


File: 1660371566141.png (122.45 KB, 1080x1350, onion-service-09.png)

 No.11116[Reply]

I heard the claim that hidden services don't leave the Tor network by Doctor Mike Pound ( http://grwp24hodrefzvjjuccrkw3mjq4tzhaaq32amf33dzpmuxe7ilepcmad.onion/watch?v=lVcbq_a5N9I https://redirect.invidious.io/watch?v=lVcbq_a5N9I ) and by speakers on a talk uploaded on The Tor Project's channel ( http://grwp24hodrefzvjjuccrkw3mjq4tzhaaq32amf33dzpmuxe7ilepcmad.onion/watch?v=VmsFxBEN3fc https://redirect.invidious.io/watch?v=VmsFxBEN3fc ) and I do not understand how it is possible, since as far as I understand it, the Tor node immediately before the hidden service must decrypt the data before sending it to the hidden service, making it have the same weakness as a typical exit node. As far as I am aware, a hidden service hides its location with a regular Tor circuit from a rendezvous point and regular Tor circuits leave the Tor network, so surely the network for the hidden service must leave the Tor network as well.
9 posts and 1 image reply omitted. Click reply to view.
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 No.11158

>>11156
>does rendezvous node counts as end node in a circuit?
I guess. The client and the onion site both build their own circuit to the rendezvous node and the rendezvous node proxies traffic between them. What makes it different from an exit node is that the traffic is end to end encrypted from the client to the onion site. So there is no opportunity to spy or modify traffic.
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 No.11160

>>11158
You also for got that every node is encrypted and only the node Infront of the node behind has the encryption keys.
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 No.11161

>>11160
>You also for got that every node is encrypted and only the node Infront of the node behind has the encryption keys.
Nope because then you would have to know where the onion site is to build a circuit directly to it. It's a 3 hop circuit from client to rendezvous node, 3 hop circuit from onion to rendezvous node and neither side knows where the other is.
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 No.11163

>>11161
No you don't. That's retarded. The chain only needs to know the existence of the next link.
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 No.11164

>>11163
If clients can pick the whole chain up to the hidden service they can just pick 3 nodes they control and the hidden service is not hidden anymore.

>That's retarded.

You're not as smart as you think you are.


File: 1642607298033.jpg (59.83 KB, 640x920, IMG_20210904_114347_891-1.jpg)

 No.10956[Reply]

Anyone else here dabble in cryptocurrency?
18 posts omitted. Click reply to view.
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 No.11105

Ya know how in Metro they use bullets as currency? Could that work as a sort of physical decentralized currency?
Like, one of the reasons I don't use crypto is because blockchains effectively broadcast all transactions directly to the feds in an immutable ledger. What would one use if they wanted to make a transaction in private?
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 No.11155

>>10956
Only nazis are interested in crypto. Stay poor comrades.

>>11105
>Ya know how in Metro they use bullets as currency? Could that work as a sort of physical decentralized currency?
Money needs to have 3 properties:
1. non-perishable (iron rusts but gold is basically indestructible).
2. divisible (gold can be chopped down into arbitrarily small amounts)
3. hard to make more of (most important)

Bullets work in a post-apocalypse setting because nobody can just build a factory and churn out millions of new bullets per day. Cigarettes work in jail because it is hard to smuggle them inside. The fiat system barely works because the government uses police and military to fuck up anyone who tries to print their own money.

So while heavy industry and transportation is still operational, and it is not an illegal item under law, then a consumer good such as bullets won't work well as currency.
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 No.11157

>>11155
>Only nazis are interested in crypto. Stay poor comrades.
how's that "to the moon" going for you buddy lol?

the only use value of this fancy toy is to pay for vpn and vps
I can't even reliably circumvent capitalist banks with this shit because they ban your ass as soon as they see a "suspicious" activity

I have money essentially stuck in the computer, anything more than paying bills and your bank will ban your ass for suspicious transactions from randoms

the only way is to bend the knee and go to backdoored regulated exchanges
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 No.11159

>>11157
If technology is being suppressed by the establishment then it is a threat to the establishment.
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 No.11162

>>11155
>Only Nazis are interested in crypto.



What did he mean by this,.?


File: 1663240018719.jpg (124.34 KB, 1280x720, 1662407454795327.jpg)

 No.11143[Reply]

i need a cheap, portable, low storage laptop but the cheapest ones at my local walmart are fucking chrome books? Are chromebooks ok if you put linux on them or are they just garbage all together? What can I do?
1 post omitted. Click reply to view.
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 No.11145

I think you have to reflash the bios to but linux on a chrome book which can get tricky.
What is you r budget, I'd just save up and get the cheapest system 76 laptop or get one at Costco.
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 No.11146

>>11144
Based digits
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 No.11147

bought a refurbished thinkpad twice, worked out fine for me both times. battery life kinda sucked though.
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 No.11148

>>11147
I have a think pad but they are too bulky and obnoxious. I'm trying to not seem like a massive dick head in public with a giant laptop
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 No.11149

File: 1663400943888.jpg (145.46 KB, 1124x1091, 0dd56675bbc4e8658012d5997e….jpg)

>>11143
Linux Chromebooks are great! I have a Toshiba Chromebook 2 that runs gallium OS and it's been a nice little machine for several years now. It's getting a bit old so I'm considering replacing it at the end of the year. Here are a few things you should know before getting started.
1. Make sure you get a machine with a compatible processor. I believe only x86 intel CPUs will work.
2. You will likely need to flash in firmware and possibly remove a write-protection screw. Have a screwdriver that can manipulate little laptop screws.
3. Upgrading the SSD is STRONGLY recommended. Most Chromebooks come with 16GB ssds, grossly insufficient for a proper PC. You can get a 256GB ssd for as little as $40. Make sure it is the correct size for your machine. Suffice to say, be sure to get a machine with a removable ssd.
4. Do NOT install Gallium OS. Although my currant machine runs Gallium OS and most old websites will point you to it, it is an abandoned project (no updates in nearly 3 years). I'll probably install Debian with XFCE, but the anything distro with a lightweight desktop environment should be fine.

Here's a site that will walk you through the changing the firmware, it also has a list of comparable devices.
https://mrchromebox.tech/#home


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